Hackers of the angels.
“I think that I am learning to become a leader. So there are some ups and downs, but we grew as a club which I am very happy about.  And I learned to talk to and communicate more with people.  We hold events and projects and info sessions.. mainly targeting women.

I think there’s this stigma that women are not fit for doing technical roles, or in hard sciences in general. And I think its not very accurate.  So, I’m trying to in a way diversify the tech industry and also give women more confidence to do harder roles.  Because society always tells you oh, doing computer science is really hard, why don’t you do something easier so I think working towards breaking down that stereotype is important to me.”

Angela is a senior studying dance and computer science at the University of California, Irvine and is the president of Women in Information and Computing Sciences.  She was also an organizer for Hack UCI and is an intern at Peoplespace, a tech hub for hackers and startups.

Angela Li | WICS

“I think that I am learning to become a leader. So there are some ups and downs, but we grew as a club which I am very happy about.  And I learned to talk to and communicate more with people.  We hold events and projects and info sessions.. mainly targeting women.

I think there’s this stigma that women are not fit for doing technical roles, or in hard sciences in general. And I think its not very accurate.  So, I’m trying to in a way diversify the tech industry and also give women more confidence to do harder roles.  Because society always tells you oh, doing computer science is really hard, why don’t you do something easier so I think working towards breaking down that stereotype is important to me.”

Angela is a senior studying dance and computer science at the University of California, Irvine and is the president of Women in Information and Computing Sciences.  She was also an organizer for Hack UCI and is an intern at Peoplespace, a tech hub for hackers and startups.

Angela Li | WICS

Tagged: #hackers of LA
“The constant tug of war is educating people about technology and what it means to build a product from scratch.  Unfortunately, the majority of people don’t understand what it takes to develop and maintain a product. In this interface that looks very simple [Skype] there are so many different components (and people) that make it work and function the way it does.

The general trend we’re seeing is that everyone believes they can get into technology, right? It’s not a bad thing, but people need to make sure they’re realistic. Just because the barriers of entry are so low, that doesn’t constitute this belief that after 6 months you’re a proven product expert… It’s a lot of educating because we’re reverse engineering what people have told themselves to be this simple and easy trade.”

Russell works at Brand Knew, a creative agency and technology accelerator that offers services in product development, brand development, and social marketing. Next week they will be hosting their inaugural Causathon, (at General Assembly) a hackathon with a vision to produce impactful technology solutions for non-profit organizations.

Russell Meyerowitz | Brand Knew

“The constant tug of war is educating people about technology and what it means to build a product from scratch.  Unfortunately, the majority of people don’t understand what it takes to develop and maintain a product. In this interface that looks very simple [Skype] there are so many different components (and people) that make it work and function the way it does.

The general trend we’re seeing is that everyone believes they can get into technology, right? It’s not a bad thing, but people need to make sure they’re realistic. Just because the barriers of entry are so low, that doesn’t constitute this belief that after 6 months you’re a proven product expert… It’s a lot of educating because we’re reverse engineering what people have told themselves to be this simple and easy trade.”

Russell works at Brand Knew, a creative agency and technology accelerator that offers services in product development, brand development, and social marketing. Next week they will be hosting their inaugural Causathon, (at General Assembly) a hackathon with a vision to produce impactful technology solutions for non-profit organizations.

Russell Meyerowitz | Brand Knew

Tagged: #hackers of LA
“The whole process intimidated me. I ran into developers early on in my career, and when they would walk me through their code, and on the surface it looks a lot more complicated than it actually is.  So being a developer never really occurred to me because I never really thought I could do it. I was really pushed by people that I got to know and they were like yeah you can totally do this which gave me the confidence to try.  The caveat that I will say is that with self-taught developers, so someone at my ability, I certainly don’t have any illusions that I could go in and architect a complicated system at this point, but I think the important thing is is that you learn how to learn and take it step by step.  If you just solve one problem at a time, you’ll look up after several months and you will be amazed at the progress.”

Erin is a self-taught coder and independent product management consultant. She previously worked at TrueCar and eHarmony. She learned how to code using The Ruby on Rails Tutorial by Michael Hartl.
Erin Jancic | LinkedIn

“The whole process intimidated me. I ran into developers early on in my career, and when they would walk me through their code, and on the surface it looks a lot more complicated than it actually is.  So being a developer never really occurred to me because I never really thought I could do it. I was really pushed by people that I got to know and they were like yeah you can totally do this which gave me the confidence to try.  The caveat that I will say is that with self-taught developers, so someone at my ability, I certainly don’t have any illusions that I could go in and architect a complicated system at this point, but I think the important thing is is that you learn how to learn and take it step by step.  If you just solve one problem at a time, you’ll look up after several months and you will be amazed at the progress.”

Erin is a self-taught coder and independent product management consultant. She previously worked at TrueCar and eHarmony. She learned how to code using The Ruby on Rails Tutorial by Michael Hartl.

Erin Jancic | LinkedIn

Tagged: #hackers of LA
“The percentages are actually decreasing by the year.  We’re at 12% right now.. [the percentage of women studying computer science] used to be 38%. So what we’re doing is we’re setting up workshops for middle school girls throughout LA… We have the girls play with soft circuits, and wearable computing, and robots to get them interesting in computer science.  

When I tell people that I’m a computer science major, they’re just like ‘No… you’re not.” I don’t think that girls think about computer science as a major when applying to college because it’s often correlated with guys who are nerdy and not social.  But it’s really about creativity and thinking outside of the box.

Isn’t coding like super addicting, though? If you don’t have your laptop on you like all the time you just get like separation anxiety. One time (my roommate thinks I’m really weird for doing this) we were sleeping, and it was 3:00 in the morning and I got up and was like ‘Oh my God, I figured it out!’ I jumped to my laptop and and she was just like ‘what are you doing?!’ Yeah, It’s like that.”

Katrina is a computer science and business student at USC.  She currently works at CSavvy, non-profit organization aims to encourage and empower young middle school girls into the field of computer science.

Katrina Gloriani | CSavvy

“The percentages are actually decreasing by the year.  We’re at 12% right now.. [the percentage of women studying computer science] used to be 38%. So what we’re doing is we’re setting up workshops for middle school girls throughout LA… We have the girls play with soft circuits, and wearable computing, and robots to get them interesting in computer science.  

When I tell people that I’m a computer science major, they’re just like ‘No… you’re not.” I don’t think that girls think about computer science as a major when applying to college because it’s often correlated with guys who are nerdy and not social.  But it’s really about creativity and thinking outside of the box.

Isn’t coding like super addicting, though? If you don’t have your laptop on you like all the time you just get like separation anxiety. One time (my roommate thinks I’m really weird for doing this) we were sleeping, and it was 3:00 in the morning and I got up and was like ‘Oh my God, I figured it out!’ I jumped to my laptop and and she was just like ‘what are you doing?!’ Yeah, It’s like that.”

Katrina is a computer science and business student at USC.  She currently works at CSavvy, non-profit organization aims to encourage and empower young middle school girls into the field of computer science.

Katrina Gloriani | CSavvy

Tagged: #hackers of LA
“There was this tech meetup, with two other girls there. So we naturally gravitated towards each other and just kind of clicked. When we had dinner the next week, we ended up talking about how we wanted to learn to code. But it’s hard to do it alone! All three of us have a passion for technology, so we thought—why not learn together? And that became—why not invite others to learn with us?” 
Fast-forward a year later and the HTML5/CSS course is off and running. 
“What I think makes Chicks Can Code successful is the community aspect.  The resources are out there already for people to use—like Code Academy and Treehouse and stuff like that. But what’s missing is the ability to learn with someone else. To have that with a face-to-face connection (or just being able to communicate with someone along the way) is crucial.  I think that when people see that there is a community of women interested in technology, it draws you in because then it’s like, oh, there are other people like me.” 
Kelsey is a co-founder of Chicks Can Code, a Long Beach, CA based organization that aims at teaching women ages 18+ how to code. She’s also a statistician at Glidewell Laboratories, one of the largest dental labs in the world.
Kelsey O’Neill | Chicks Can Code

“There was this tech meetup, with two other girls there. So we naturally gravitated towards each other and just kind of clicked. When we had dinner the next week, we ended up talking about how we wanted to learn to code. But it’s hard to do it alone! All three of us have a passion for technology, so we thought—why not learn together? And that became—why not invite others to learn with us?” 

Fast-forward a year later and the HTML5/CSS course is off and running. 

“What I think makes Chicks Can Code successful is the community aspect.  The resources are out there already for people to use—like Code Academy and Treehouse and stuff like that. But what’s missing is the ability to learn with someone else. To have that with a face-to-face connection (or just being able to communicate with someone along the way) is crucial.  I think that when people see that there is a community of women interested in technology, it draws you in because then it’s like, oh, there are other people like me.” 

Kelsey is a co-founder of Chicks Can Code, a Long Beach, CA based organization that aims at teaching women ages 18+ how to code. She’s also a statistician at Glidewell Laboratories, one of the largest dental labs in the world.

Kelsey O’Neill | Chicks Can Code

Tagged: #hackers of LA

“I thought, there’s no way this is ever going to happen until I got the call - Yo, you’re flying to Toronto at 6:00 am tomorrow, I need you sharp. To think that this time last year I was just joining OVO Fest, and now I’m working on his team full-time for his [Drake’s] tours.
My goal is to work closely with all these people and see our creative dreams come to life. It upsets me to see people settle into situations that they aren’t truly passionate about, or work that doesn’t get them excited to wake up to every morning. People often ask me how I am able to work as hard as I do on as little as four to five hours of sleep each night. The truth is, success comes from putting in those long hours, laying it all on the line, and dedicating your life to achieving your goals. By simply loving what you do and surrounding yourself with motivated people, you can accomplish anything.
…We only have one shot at this thing called life, you know. Might as well go for it all.”
Tyler is a recent USC graduate and the President and CEO of EgoFlow, a record label and management company. Additionally, he works part-time at Beats Music in their Content Partnerships department. This year he was the Assistant Artist and Tour Manager for Drake’s Would You Like A Tour?, OVO Festival, and the Lil Wayne America’s Most Wanted Tour. He got to travel around Europe for 40 days and still managed to get his homework done.

Tyler Henry | EgoFlow

“I thought, there’s no way this is ever going to happen until I got the call - Yo, you’re flying to Toronto at 6:00 am tomorrow, I need you sharp. To think that this time last year I was just joining OVO Fest, and now I’m working on his team full-time for his [Drake’s] tours.

My goal is to work closely with all these people and see our creative dreams come to life. It upsets me to see people settle into situations that they aren’t truly passionate about, or work that doesn’t get them excited to wake up to every morning. People often ask me how I am able to work as hard as I do on as little as four to five hours of sleep each night. The truth is, success comes from putting in those long hours, laying it all on the line, and dedicating your life to achieving your goals. By simply loving what you do and surrounding yourself with motivated people, you can accomplish anything.

…We only have one shot at this thing called life, you know. Might as well go for it all.”

Tyler is a recent USC graduate and the President and CEO of EgoFlow, a record label and management company. Additionally, he works part-time at Beats Music in their Content Partnerships department. This year he was the Assistant Artist and Tour Manager for Drake’s Would You Like A Tour?, OVO Festival, and the Lil Wayne America’s Most Wanted Tour. He got to travel around Europe for 40 days and still managed to get his homework done.

Tyler Henry | EgoFlow

“I am  a chatty person, as you can tell.  [Social media] is a mix of being socially engaged with people, but you still have the technology element. It’s humanity and technology married together, and you’ve got social media. And, it entails a lot of customer service. You get to create these engagement opportunities that are really exciting for people who are on the other end of the computer. You are bonding the brand with the people and trying to create that connection. I love that.

The best part [of my job] is seeing the products actually go live online. The process is exciting because I just love tinkering on the computer and I love the technology and putting it all together and seeing how it’s going to look.  But actually seeing it function, and seeing others engage with it, that’s my favorite part.”

Tracy is the founder of Royally Social, which offers social media strategy and consulting for small businesses.

Tracy Owens Vance | Royally Social

“I am  a chatty person, as you can tell.  [Social media] is a mix of being socially engaged with people, but you still have the technology element. It’s humanity and technology married together, and you’ve got social media. And, it entails a lot of customer service. You get to create these engagement opportunities that are really exciting for people who are on the other end of the computer. You are bonding the brand with the people and trying to create that connection. I love that.

The best part [of my job] is seeing the products actually go live online. The process is exciting because I just love tinkering on the computer and I love the technology and putting it all together and seeing how it’s going to look.  But actually seeing it function, and seeing others engage with it, that’s my favorite part.”

Tracy is the founder of Royally Social, which offers social media strategy and consulting for small businesses.

Tracy Owens Vance | Royally Social

Tagged: #hackers of LA
On hackathons:

“You have this time period; 36 hours in LA Hacks case, to build this product that could go on and do something great or change the whole industry even.  It’s such a raw form of starting a company and I think the people who thrive in hackathons, have what it takes to go on to do great things because it’s such a challenging environment that really drives you to do big things.

The future is actually the most exciting part of it right now… We kind of see [LA Hacks] as this sort of flagship program that can really show that UCLA and Los Angeles in general can really be a tech center, and already sort of is in a way. We hear the term Stanford of the South being thrown around, but it’s underappreciated and unknown that there are a lot of resources down here, there are a lot of people who are excited about tech, there’s a lot of great companies - Tinder, Snapchat- and this Silicon Beach movement.”

Drew and Daniel are both students at UCLA studying economics and chemical engineering respectively.  This summer, Drew is a product intern at a mobile dating startup, and Daniel is now working as legal intern at Obagi and Stodder, having previously worked as an iOS developer for Raft. They will both be directing the largest and most diverse hackathon in the country, LA Hacks,  this upcoming year.  In addition to the main hackathon at LA Hacks, there will be Hackcamp, which teaches first-timers how to code so they can be active participants in the hackathon.

Drew Glicker and Daniel Graupensperger (left to right) | LA Hacks

On hackathons:

“You have this time period; 36 hours in LA Hacks case, to build this product that could go on and do something great or change the whole industry even.  It’s such a raw form of starting a company and I think the people who thrive in hackathons, have what it takes to go on to do great things because it’s such a challenging environment that really drives you to do big things.

The future is actually the most exciting part of it right now… We kind of see [LA Hacks] as this sort of flagship program that can really show that UCLA and Los Angeles in general can really be a tech center, and already sort of is in a way. We hear the term Stanford of the South being thrown around, but it’s underappreciated and unknown that there are a lot of resources down here, there are a lot of people who are excited about tech, there’s a lot of great companies - Tinder, Snapchat- and this Silicon Beach movement.”

Drew and Daniel are both students at UCLA studying economics and chemical engineering respectively.  This summer, Drew is a product intern at a mobile dating startup, and Daniel is now working as legal intern at Obagi and Stodder, having previously worked as an iOS developer for Raft. They will both be directing the largest and most diverse hackathon in the country, LA Hacks,  this upcoming year.  In addition to the main hackathon at LA Hacks, there will be Hackcamp, which teaches first-timers how to code so they can be active participants in the hackathon.

Drew Glicker and Daniel Graupensperger (left to right) | LA Hacks

Tagged: #hackers of LA
“The best part about working on the game is just watching people play it… When you’ve been staring at something for so long, like 25-30 hours a week, its just really nice to sort of see a pair of fresh eyes look at it and just have a really good time playing your game… Sometimes when you’re staring at something for so long you can forget why its fun, but there are moments when other people are playing it that really reaffirm the magic of game development.”

Jordan Klein is Bloom’s Lead Producer. Bloom is a 2.5D adventure platformer where you play as a seedling named Sprout who wields the powers of nature in order to reclaim earth from the dangerous machines who have taken over. A fun fact about the game is that it was the first game the art director (Bryce Kho) ever did art for.

Jordan Klein | Bloom

“The best part about working on the game is just watching people play it… When you’ve been staring at something for so long, like 25-30 hours a week, its just really nice to sort of see a pair of fresh eyes look at it and just have a really good time playing your game… Sometimes when you’re staring at something for so long you can forget why its fun, but there are moments when other people are playing it that really reaffirm the magic of game development.”

Jordan Klein is Bloom’s Lead Producer. Bloom is a 2.5D adventure platformer where you play as a seedling named Sprout who wields the powers of nature in order to reclaim earth from the dangerous machines who have taken over. A fun fact about the game is that it was the first game the art director (Bryce Kho) ever did art for.

Jordan Klein | Bloom

Tagged: #hackers of LA
“That’s our next focus: building our female developer community at Peoplespace… we had a hackathon with HackUCI and they actually had so many ladies! It was one of the most diverse hackathons I’ve seen. The percentage of women was much, much higher than other hackathons.  We feel like the market’s there for girl hackers who are just sort of hiding, and we’re determined to get them out of hiding. 

The whole point is just to expose them to think about Computer Science differently.  Sometimes they think, like, oh well, it’s not for me… that’s math, that’s science, that’s computer stuff.  But I’m talking to more college students who understand that this is not just about computers, science and math.  It’s about building really cool stuff and it’s about entrepreneurship and building your own business and living the life you choose.  This goes beyond just trying to be an engineer or a coder or hacker.” 

Melinda is the Executive Director for Peoplespace, a tech hub for hackers and startups.  She is also the founder of Aspirely, which aims to generate a community of women that motivate, inspire, and support one another aspiring to reach their talents and passions. 

Melinda Kim | Peoplespace

“That’s our next focus: building our female developer community at Peoplespace… we had a hackathon with HackUCI and they actually had so many ladies! It was one of the most diverse hackathons I’ve seen. The percentage of women was much, much higher than other hackathons.  We feel like the market’s there for girl hackers who are just sort of hiding, and we’re determined to get them out of hiding.

The whole point is just to expose them to think about Computer Science differently.  Sometimes they think, like, oh well, it’s not for me… that’s math, that’s science, that’s computer stuff.  But I’m talking to more college students who understand that this is not just about computers, science and math.  It’s about building really cool stuff and it’s about entrepreneurship and building your own business and living the life you choose.  This goes beyond just trying to be an engineer or a coder or hacker.”

Melinda is the Executive Director for Peoplespace, a tech hub for hackers and startups.  She is also the founder of Aspirely, which aims to generate a community of women that motivate, inspire, and support one another aspiring to reach their talents and passions.

Melinda Kim | Peoplespace

Tagged: #hackers of LA
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